Monday, July 27, 2020

History Magazines Online

Campaspe Regional Library has expanded its selection of online magazines available for patrons through RB Digital.  The selection now available includes a number of history magazines, which can all be downloaded and read on you PC, tablet or iPad.  Below is a small selection of the "All About History" specials available.

On Bosworth field in 1485 the feud that had caused bloodshed and battle for three decades came to an end. The victor was the last hope of the Lancastrians, Henry Tudor. In this book, you'll get the full picture of how Henry's Tudor dynasty cemented its place in history, from the red-soaked fields of the War of the Roses, to the string of Tudor monarchs, to what everyday life was like for the lowly population. Packed with beautiful illustrations and insights into the period, this is the perfect guide for anyone who wants to expand their knowledge of the most legendary period of English history. Featuring: Battle for the throne - Find out how the War of the Roses came to be and the key battles that decided its victors The key figures - From Henry VII to Elizabeth, by way of Henry VIII's wives and Thomas Cromwell, get to know the key Tudor players Tudor life - See what life was like for everyday folk as well as the upper classes in the Tudor period Change & Legacy - From religious to artistic revolution, discover how the period has affected life to the present day.

The mid-17th century was one of the most explosive periods in history across the British Isles. In England, a desperate king fought bitterly against his defiant Parliament; in Scotland religious turmoil sparked invasions from the north; and in Ireland, an oppressive regime led to an all-out Catholic rebellion. In this bookazine, we explore the how all these events, and more, combined to make up the British Civil Wars, from the political machinations of Parliament to the bloody battlefield clashes at Edgehill, Naseby and Marston Moor. We follow the meteoric rise of Oliver Cromwell and his New Model Army, as well as the tragic decline of Charles I – a king executed by his own subjects. We also investigate how the countries transformed in the period of Interregnum, for better and for worse, before taking a look at how the monarchy made a stunningly peaceful return during the Restoration.

The Life And Times Of The Stuarts focuses on a nation-defining period of British history that is every bit as enthralling, dramatic and pivotal as that of Henry VIII and co. BBC History magazine now turns its attention from The Story Of The Tudors to the seismic changes that occurred within the British Isles during the Stuart rule between 1603 and 1714. Inside you will find: • The Gunpowder Plot • The English Civil War • Charles I’s execution • Oliver Cromwell’s rule • The restoration of the monarchy • The ousting of James II in the Glorious Revolution and many other key events in British history! This special edition calls upon the expertise and analysis of the world’s leading historians as an in-depth and invaluable way to understand more about this absorbing time.



Meet the colourful monarchs who reigned though some of Britain’s most tumultuous and dramatic centuries Inside you will discover: -A timeline of key milestones, from the Norman conquest to the fall of Richard III at the battle of Bosworth -The regal women who stamped their mark on medieval Britain: Matilda, Isabella of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine -The motives and military exploits of Henry V, Edward I and Richard the Lionheart -How Owain Glyndwr and Robert Bruce fought English rule in Wales and Scotland -The debates that still rage about Richard III and the death of Edward II -Civil Wars that rocked England, pitting Matilda against Stephen and York against Lancaster

Friday, July 24, 2020

Ancestry Library Edition from home extended

Ancestry has just announced that home access to Ancestry Library Edition will continue for another month, until 31 August.  They made the decision back in April to allow this database, normally only accessed in the library buildings using our public PCs or wi-fi, to be accessed from home while libraries were either closed or only open to limited numbers.  So those Campaspe Regional Library members who are still unable to research Ancestry Library Edition in the library can continue to access this fantastic genealogical resource from home.

To access Ancestry Library Edition, you need to go to the Campaspe Regional Library web page at https://www.campaspe.vic.gov.au/library  On the right hand column, click on the link for 'Things to do from Home'.  The link for Ancestry Library Edition from home is at the top right.  You will be prompted to log in using your library card number and PIN, then follow the prompts to Ancestry's page and continue researching your family history from the comfort of home.

A huge thank you to Ancestry for making this resource available from home during the pandemic.  I hope you all enjoy access and stay safe.

Monday, July 20, 2020

Family Tree Magazine

Among the new eMagazines available for free Campaspe Library patrons through RB Digital is the US Family Tree magazine.  Check out the July/August edition now.

What’s Inside!

Highlights from this issue include:

  • Our annual list of the 101 Best Genealogy Websites
  • a quick guide to using Family Tree Maker
  • Tips for becoming a professional genealogist—and other ways of using your genealogy skills in the workforce
  • Expert analysis on how to protect your DNA information
  • a FREE US census cheat sheet

Contents

Good as Gold by David A. Fryxell

We won’t see medals awarded this summer after all. But these 101 Best Genealogy Websites are all winners in our book.

Maker’s Mark by the Editors of Family Tree Magazine

Document and organize your hard-earned research with these 12 tips for using the Family Tree Maker software.

Red-Handed by Amanda Epperson

Because Irish records are often scarce, those researching ancestors from Ulster have their hands full. But these seven websites will help you find your Scots-Irish roots.

Hanging Your Shingle by Diana Elder and Nicole Dyer

Achieving genealogy credentials can help you raise your family history “rank.” Here’s how to earn them through the two most prominent organizations.

Alternate Roots by Sunny Jane Morton

You never know where the road of life will take you. Put your research skills to good use with these six genealogy “dream jobs.”

Plus!

  • State Research Guides: Maryland and Oklahoma
  • Lisa’s Picks
  • Timeline: Archery
  • Family History Home: Caring for Wedding Finery
  • Stories to Tell
  • Your Turn: Relationship Chart
  • Document Detective: Cemetery Interment Ledgers
  • Now What
  • Tech Toolkit
  • DNA Q&A: How Can I Keep My DNA Information Private?

Friday, July 17, 2020

Genealogy Events Online

As the Corona Virus pandemic shuts down so much across the globe and most of us are staying pretty close to home, more and more genealogy events that would have been held locally are now going online.  That means there are more and more talks, seminars, conferences and training sessions held around the world that we can attend online from the comfort and safety of home.  While for me attending online cannot beat personally attending these events - the chatting, the networking, the sharing ideas with other attendees - it does give me the chance to virtually participate in events I never could have traveled to in person.

Its really worth your time to look around at what is available.  Gould Genealogy has a list of online genealogy events on their homepage.  The Virtual Genealogical Association is completely online and offers a number of talks and presentations each month.  FamilySearch continues to offer a range of online classes and tutorials.  Legacy Family Tree is offering several webinars free each month.  And there are many more.

A number of research facilities are offering special or free access.  The UK National Archives has announced in April that it was offering free access to its digital records for as long as it remains closed to the public during the Coronavirus pandemic.  How much longer that access will remain free is unknown, but it has certainly been a boon to many who have been researching from home in the past few months. 
Ancestry recently announced that home access the Ancestry Library Edition for patrons of subscribing libraries will continue until 31 July.  The Family History Show made the move to host their annual conference online to replace the family history events closed due to the coronavirus outbreak.  The Family History Show Online took place in late June.  There are many more, from single talks to genealogy society meetings to major conferences, that have made the move to online in order to keep functioning.

Virtual tours of many cultural institutions have sprung up as well.  The British Museum is allowing virtual visitors to search the collection online to view specific objects or find out more about individual galleries. 
The Hermitage Museum announced they were preparing a large quantity of broadcasts to view on their YouTube and Instagram channels. So far they are only in Russian, but in the near future they plan to begin broadcasting in other languages too – English, Italian and more.  The Smithsonian Open Access applies to digital assets that are created, stored, or maintained by the Smithsonian. This might include text, still images, sound recordings, research datasets, 3D models, collections data, and more.

As the pandemic changes the way we live, genealogy has changed with it, and the way we research, learn and interact with fellow genealogists changes too.  For those who often miss out on conferences because of the cost of travel and demands of work and family, the increase of online participation may even prove an advantage in many ways.

So keep an eye on what is available online and check out some of the talks, seminars and conferences that are out there.  Happy researching.

Saturday, July 11, 2020

Traces Magazine

Traces uncovers Australian history, from ancient Indigenous heritage to European settlement, local history, artefacts and genealogy.

Launched in December 2017, Traces is the only quarterly printed magazine dedicated to providing its readers with insight into the latest historical research, news and heritage projects taking place around Australia. The expert voices of historians, researchers, heritage professionals, genealogists, and journalists uncover the fascinating characters and stories of our past.

With the partnership and collaboration of key national and local heritage organisations, as well as state libraries, Traces has its finger on the pulse of heritage news and developments around the country, making it the best consumer publication for anyone passionate about Australian history and genealogy.

Traces magazine is available free in digital form from Campaspe Regional Library via our eMagazines from RB Digital.  Ask our staff for more information or how to download onto your PC, tablet or iPad.

Monday, July 6, 2020

National Archives UK Free Access

Have you been taking advantage of the free access to The National Archives during lockdown?  The UK National Archives has announced in April that it was offering free access to its digital records for as long as it remains closed to the public during the Coronavirus pandemic.  How much longer that access will remain free is unknown, but it has certainly been a boon to many who have been researching from home in the past few months.

Users can download records digitised by The National Archives and published through Discovery, its online catalogue. These include:

  • First and Second World War records, including medal index cards
  • Military records, including unit war diaries
  • Royal and Merchant Navy records, including Royal Marine service records
  • Wills from the jurisdiction of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury
  • Migration records, including aliens’ registration cards and naturalisation case papers
  • 20th century Cabinet Papers and Security Service files
  • Domesday Book

Registered users can order and download up to 10 items at no cost, to a maximum of 50 items over 30 days. National Archives explains that the limits are there 'to try and help manage the demand for content and ensure the availability of our digital services for everyone'.  Registration itself is also free.

To access the service and download for free, users will be required to:

  • Register/sign in to their Discovery account before adding items to their basket (maximum ten items per basket)
  • Abide by the terms of the fair use policy
  • Complete the order process to receive a download link, which will remain active for 30 days. (The link will also be saved in ‘Your orders’ in your account for 30 days)
So if you haven't already been downloading records, make sure you take advantage of this great offer of free records while they last, and see what new detail you can find about your family history.

Wednesday, July 1, 2020

WDYTYA Magazine

The latest issue of Who Do You Think You Are magazine is now available free online for Campaspe Library members via our subscription to RB Digital eMagazines.

Inside this month's issue

  • Free records from The National Archives Discover millions of online family history records that are now unlocked during lockdown

  • Marriage records What does it mean if your ancestors were 'married by certificate'?
  • Postwar photographs The latest in our family photo dating series from National Trust curator Catherine Troiano
  • Catholic ancestors How to find Roman Catholic baptism records
  • Holiday camps Can't get away this year? We look back at the golden age of British holiday camps
  • Strathclyde Our complete guide to finding Scottish ancestors in the area around Glasgow
  • Plus... The best websites for finding coal miner ancestors; the secret history of private eyes; tracing family in Wales, and much more...

Friday, June 19, 2020

Using Ancestry Library Edition from home

During the Covid-19 outbreak, the wonderful people from Ancestry have allowed public libraries to make Ancestry Library Edition available for our members to use from home.  Normally this database can only be accessed in the library, using our public PCs or wi-fi.  It has been a fantastic resource to offer people while they have been quarantining at home, especially while libraries were closed or operating with reduced numbers as they are now.

This access was to end 30 June, but Ancestry has just announced that home access will continue for another month, until 31 July.  So those Campaspe Regional Library members who are still self-isolating can continue to access this fantastic genealogical resource from home.

To access Ancestry Library Edition, go to the Campaspe Regional Library web page at https://www.campaspe.vic.gov.au/library  On the right hand column, click on the link for 'Things to do from Home'.  The link for Ancestry Library Edition from home is at the top right.  You will be prompted to log in using your library card number and PIN, then follow the prompts to Ancestry's page and continue researching your family history from the comfort of home.

A huge thank you to Ancestry for making this resource available from home during the pandemic.  I hope you all enjoy access and stay safe.

Thursday, June 18, 2020

The Crazy month of May 2020 meme: pandemic experiences

I’ve seen a few genealogists posting their responses to the Covid-19 crisis and how it has changed their lives, so thought I would post my own responses as I restart my genealogy blog after the break while stood down from work.

What are you most grateful for during this covid-19 crisis? 
That I live in Australia, which has certainly fared better than many other countries.  I’m grateful for friends and family, to all the people who have stood up and pulled together during the pandemic, made the necessary changes to their lives to limit the outbreak and keep each other safe.  I’m glad I was able to work during at least part of the stand down, only spending a few weeks stood down from my job, and especially glad to be back at work, even in a somewhat limited capacity as we practice social distancing and keep working to limit risks of transmission within the community.

What have you missed most during the full or partial lock-down? 
Being able to get in the car and go anywhere I please.  Simple things like browsing through shops, having coffee with friends, going to the cinema or a restaurant when I please.

What changes have you seen in your life over the last few months? 
Certainly I am going out less, changing my usual habits to practice social distancing and keep safe.  While I have never considered myself to be particularly social, not being able to go out, meet friends, stroll through shops and chat face to face with workmates has made significant differences to life.

Have you been exercising more or less?
During the time I spent not working I tried to keep busy and keep moving, doing jobs around the house and garden, but not going out has definitely impacted my activity levels.

Has the refrigerator been your friend or foe?
A little of both.

Have you been participating in virtual gatherings with friends or family?
Some, although there are times when my internet connection can be a little slow.  I think many of us have found ourselves using technology to communicate a lot more that before the pandemic.

Have you taken up new hobbies during the lockdowns? 
The ones I have already have been enough, plus the projects around the house I have finally made time for.  Certainly being stood down from work meant more time for my hobbies than usual.

Are you cooking or gardening more? 
I have never been much of a cook – or a gardener – but during lockdown I have definitely done more of both.  Dinners were occasionally more elaborate and I even found myself baking a few cakes and scones.  The garden also shows some improvement from the extra attention.

Have you found the changes and experience stressful/anxious/worrying? 
I think there would be few who have not.  Being stood down from work was certainly stressful, but I was also aware of being much better off than many, knowing my job would still exist afterwards and having enough leave stored to see me through.

How have the closures affected your local community? 
I know many businesses are struggling and some may not survive.  There are too many who have lost their jobs – either temporarily through stand-downs of permanently through business closures, and the losses will continue to be felt for months to come.  While so many have struggled, it has been wonderful to see so many pulling together to look after each other and help out friends and neighbors.

Have in-person meetings been replaced with virtual meetings via Zoom, Skype etc? 
In some areas, yes, it has certainly been a change.  Living in a country town online attendance to meetings has always been an option, but it is much more common now.

Do you enjoy the virtual meeting format? 
Sometimes.  It can be difficult missing out on face to face contact and the ability to chat to friends and colleagues during breaks.  Meetings are all very well, it is the networking and socializing that happens around the edges that I miss.   

Are you working from home instead of in your usual place of work? 
No – after we closed to the public and shut everything down staff were stood down. 

Have you had to cancel travel plans for pleasure or family? 
Yes.  I had been planning a trip for an upcoming significant birthday (50th!!) and those plans have had to be cancelled.  I will look into something closer to home in the meantime, and look to a bigger trip next year.  Australia has plenty to offer, places I have never been, and I think local travel will be the only option for months to come.

Have you/others been wearing masks when out and about in your area? 
Not many masks locally, but there have been a few around.  I haven’t worn one yet but have used gloves and plenty of hand sanitizer (when I could get it), and am much more aware of things like wiping shopping trolley handles and washing thoroughly when I get home.

Will you change your lifestyle after this experience? 
I think there will be ongoing changes for many people, in the way we live, shop and work.  While many things will return to normal it is very much a case of ‘wait and see’.

Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Family History Show Goes Online

The Family History Show is hosting their new virtual show this weekend to replace the family history events closed due to the coronavirus outbreak.  The Family History Show Online will take place from 10am to 4.30pm on Saturday 20 June (UK time).

The promotional video promises “access to all your favourite family history features from the comfort of your own home”, including online talks, the chance to submit questions to a panel of experts, family history products available to purchase and download, virtual chat with exhibitors and a virtual goody bag worth over £10.

The speakers will include genealogy expert Mark Bayley, house historian Gill Blanchard and military historian Chris Baker.

Tickets are £5.50 in advance or £6 on the day and you can access the show on Windows 7 or newer, Mac, iOS and Android.  The Family History Show recommends a broadband speed of 10Mbs or higher to engage in video or chat.

The Family History Show is organised by the magazine Discover Your Ancestors and normally holds three annual events in Bristol, York and London.

If, like me, you will be attending from another time zone, lectures and live streams will be available for 24 hours and you can submit questions to their experts in advance.

Monday, June 15, 2020

WDYTYA Magazine

The latest issue of Who Do You Think You Are magazine is now available free online for Campaspe Library members via our subscription to RB Digital eMagazines.

Inside this month's issue

  • Parish registers online
    Find your ancestors' baptisms, marriages and burials in our annual county-by-county guide to British parish records online
  • Sort your photographs
    Looking for a lockdown project? Discover how to organise, digitise and share your family photographs
  • Reader story
    Stephen King shares the moving tale of his parents' wartime romance
  • Firemen
    The story of how our ancestors fought the flames
  • Jamaican ancestors
    The best online records for finding family from the Caribbean nation
  • Plus...
    The best websites for finding prisoners of war; the lives of Sheffield's cutlery manufacturers; using Name & Place software, and much more...
     

Around Britain

  • Devon
    How the historic county is marking the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower - and how you can trace your Devon ancestors

Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Campaspe Genealogy is back!

From Monday 1 June Campaspe Libraries reopened to the public in a limited capacity following Government guidelines and observing social distancing.  I hope everyone out there has stayed safe and well during the shut down and look forward to getting back to genealogy and a more 'normal' life over the next few weeks and months.

May has certainly been a very different month this year, and a challenging time for so many.  It is wonderful to be able to come back to work, see colleagues and people in the community, and start trying to rebuild after the shut down.

I hope the past weeks have not been too challenging for you all.  For myself, my garage is organised, several jobs around the house have finally been completed, and I have been able to spend a bit of extra time on genealogy during my time at home.

More to come!

Thursday, April 16, 2020

Covid-19 Shut Down

Campaspe libraries and depots are closed until further notice, in line with the Federal Government’s direction for non-essential services.

This Blog will not be monitored during the closure.

I wish everyone out the the best during the closure and look forward to restarting Campaspe Genealogy when restrictions are lifted and I am back at work.

Wednesday, April 15, 2020

WDYTYA Magazine

The latest issue of Who Do You Think You Are magazine is now available free online for Campaspe Library members via our subscription to RB Digital eMagazines.

Inside this month's issue
  • DNA ethnicity
    What do the percentages in your DNA test result mean? Debbie Kennett explains
  • Swedish mystery
    How genealogist Emma Jolly tracked down the British beneficiaries to a Swedish fortune
  • The Home Front
    80 years after the start of the Blitz, discover how you can research your ancestors' lives during the Second World War
  • Reader story
    Eight generations of Paul Darran's family have served in the Army
  • Family Tree Maker 2019
    Back up your family tree to the cloud with leading family history software
  • Plus...
    The history of department stores; tracing Italian ancestors; understanding Royal Artillery records, and much more...
     
Around Britain
  • Shropshire
    Find your family in the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution

Thursday, April 9, 2020

RootsTech Free Videos

Another treat for those stuck at home during the CoronaVirus pandemic are the many videos of presentations to RootsTech.  Dating back to 2015 and coming right up to the recent 2020 conference, as well as last year's RootsTech London conference, there is a variety of keynotes and presentations available to watch free from home.

RootsTech 2020 talks now available to view
So take some time to catch up on the latest developments in the field and learn new skills from a variety of experts during your time at home.

A huge thank you to the people at RootsTech for making these presentations available - there is certainly a wide variety to choose from and I will be taking advantage of having some extra time to develop my own skills and knowledge.

Monday, April 6, 2020

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Week 12 - Namesake

In many families, we see the same names over and over.  Frequently children were named after parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles, and various other family members.  The same names just crop up time after time, and will often cause confusion for family history researchers.  Working out who is who can be extremely difficult when all a man's sons name their first male child after the child's grandfather - and suddenly there are 4 or 5 cousins with the same name all living in a small area.  This has happened to me a few times - most memorably I have 5 cousins named James Mulholland all born within 5 miles and 4 years of each other - and two of them married women named Mary!

Naming customs, while not cast in stone, were extremely common in many areas, and sometimes trying to find a name that does not link back to a member of the family can be a challenge.  Names also went through ebbs and flows or popularity, and often more frequently used names reflected current monarchs, newly born members of the royal family and popular celebrities of the day.

Another frequently used custom of the past - which can seem quite strange to us today - was using the name of a deceased child for the next born sibling of the same gender.  My 3xGreat Grandfather Isaac Green was actually the third child named Isaac born in the family - his eldest brother Isaac died at only 4 days old, his next brother was also named Isaac and died of diphtheria at 6 years old.  My direct ancestor Isaac was the next son born, the namesake of two dead brothers - and he lived to the grand age of 89.

Saturday, April 4, 2020

Free Webinars from Legacy Family Tree

The wonderful people at Legacy Family Tree are stepping up to help make time spent in lockdown at home a little more bearable for all us genealogists by launching a month of free genealogy webinars during April. 

Throughout their free month, one Legacy Family Tree webinar from the membership library will be unlocked and available to watch for free, and there’s a seven-day rotating theme:
• Sundays – Methodology
• Mondays – DNA
• Tuesdays – Ethnic Genealogy
• Wednesdays – Technology
• Thursdays – Around the Globe
• Fridays – Beginners
• Saturdays – TechZone

For the first 10 days, the schedule includes:
• Wednesday, April 1: Privacy: How to Protect Your Information Online, presented by Judy Russell
• Thursday, April 2: Untangle the Web of German Websites, presented by Teresa Steinkamp McMillan
• Friday, April 3: Getting Started in Family History – 1- Home Sources, presented by Cheri Hudson Passey
• Saturday, April 4: Google Alerts: Get Notified of New Content on Google, presented by Thomas MacEntee
• Sunday, April 5: FAN + GPS + DNA: The Problem-Solver’s Great Trifecta, presented by Elizabeth Shown Mills
• Tuesday, April 7: Jewish Genealogy’s Other Side: Sephardic Research, presented by Schelly Talalay Dardashti
• Wednesday, April 8: Crowdsourcing with Social Media to Overcome Brick Walls in Genealogy Research, presented by Amie Bowswer Tennant
• Thursday, April 9: Introduction to French-Canadian Research, presented by Michael Leclerc
• Friday, April 10: Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy – Part 1, presented by Peggy Lauritzen

 So check out a few webinars this month and see how much you can learn about researching your family history.  A big thankyou to Legacy Family Tree and all their wonderful presenters for making these talks available.

Thursday, April 2, 2020

Try a Virtual Tour

As more and more of us are staying home during the current health crisis, many public spaces are offering virtual tours of their spaces.  From museums, galleries, libraries, even zoos - the number of places you can visit from home is growing.  So here are a few places you might like to have a look at to keep yourself and the family entertained over the coming weeks.

The British Museum
Search the collection online to view specific objects or find out more about individual galleries.  Or perhaps you would like to take a virtual tour of their prints or the Oceania collection.

The Hermitage Museum
Right now, the museum states they are preparing a large quantity of broadcasts that you can view on their YouTube and Instagram channels. So far they are only in Russian, but in the near future they plan to begin broadcasting in other languages too – English, Italian and more.

The Smithsonian Open Access
Open access applies to digital assets that are created, stored, or maintained by the Smithsonian. This might include text, still images, sound recordings, research datasets, 3D models, collections data, and more.

London Medieval Murder Map
Each pin on the London map represents the approximate location of one of 142 homicides that occurred in the City of London in the first half of the 14th century. Click on a pin to read the story behind the event.

Virtual Library Tours
I Love Libraries has virtual tours of some iconic libraries, such as the Library of Parliament in Ottawa, Canada, the Mansueto Library at the University of Chicago, the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. and the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford. 

State Library of Victoria
I can't go past my home state library, with the SLV offering photos and images of many of their halls and spaces.  You can also take a tour of the history of the building.

Zoos Victoria
Watch the live cameras featuring the new snow leopard cubs (in both the nesting box and open enclosure), penguins, zebras, lions and giraffes.  As the animals go about their day they appear and disappear on the zoo cameras.

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Transcription Tuesday Makes A Comeback

As the coronavirus outbreak forces us to stay at home, Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine want to help their readers find fun and productive ways to pass the time, gain new skills and help others while observing social distancing.  As part of this, they have decided to bring back their popular Transcription Tuesday event.

For those unfamiliar with this annual event, WDYTYA readers have been able to transcribe vital family history records for volunteer projects, making them accessible to all.  Earlier this year, their army of volunteers collectively transcribed nearly 25,000 records, from nonconformist parish records to First World War Royal Navy crew lists.

WDYTYA describes transcription is a fascinating way to discover the individual stories hidden in historic records and improve your ability to read old handwriting.  It’s also a way to give back to the family history community. The record you help put online could be a vital breakthrough for another family historian.  Best of all, transcription can be done from your home on your computer or laptop – so it’s the perfect activity for the coronavirus outbreak.

During the coronavirus outbreak, WDYTYA will bring back Transcription Tuesday on a weekly basis, highlighting a different project every Tuesday.  If you have time during the day, even if it’s just a few minutes, you can take part and show your support by transcribing their chosen project.  For their first Transcription Tuesday project on 31 March, they partnering with Ancestry to support their non-profit World Archives Project.  Readers can help to work on a new set of records – English Criminal Lunatic Asylum Registers, 1820-1843.  These records include original letters, prisoner registers and inspection reports relating to the administration of convict, ship and local prisons and to their inmates.  They reveal details of prisoners such as the name, residence, age, crime and sentence.

Click here for instructions to get started transcribing the records.  Note that you will also need to register for a free Ancestry account and download the Keying Tool if you haven't already done so.  You can find out how to do so here.

It is worth noting that you can participate in Transcription Tuesday any day you want - you're not limited to just one day a week.